this is mister jones
this is mister jones
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thebackmatter:

KYD Buro / Béhance
thebackmatter:

KYD Buro / Béhance
thebackmatter:

KYD Buro / Béhance
thebackmatter:

KYD Buro / Béhance
thebackmatter:

KYD Buro / Béhance
thebackmatter:

KYD Buro / Béhance
thebackmatter:

KYD Buro / Béhance
thebackmatter:

KYD Buro / Béhance
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typeworship:

Making the invisible visible, with ink and type
After documenting its progress on Twitter for over a month, Laura Hudson’s inky typographic project reached its zenith this weekend. As part of her final degree project, Laura has created a time-lapse film of ink being absorbed into a lettered design to reveal a message about the invisible nature of mental illness.
As a sufferer of depression Laura wanted to highlight a cause she felt passionate and aligned her project with the Time to Change mental health campaign. “The idea is as the ink absorbs it’s physically making the fact visible, raising awareness.”
Inspired by Oscar Diaz’s Ink calendar, she contacted him to ask about paper typed used, but after a slightly cagey response she decided to test out different types of paper herself, finally settling on 300gsm scientific grade blotting paper.
Her lettered design was then laser cut into the paper and suspended in her studio. The ends of the paper structure rested in vials of cyan printer ink and the natural capillary action of the paper drew the pigment up the lettering. The process produced some lovely chromatic bleed effects (as shown).
Laura took time-lapse photos to record the process. In tests the ink moved 15cm in five minutes over a straight line but at the scale of the final design it slowed dramatically after six days, requiring only one photograph every 12 hours to measure its progress. Other challenges also cropped up on the way: “Unfortunately I’ll be pressing the camera shutter for my project. Time lapse is broken so now I’m babysitting!”
After a little ‘encouragement’ with warm water the ink was finally absorbed into the whole piece and the film was completed. Take a look here.
typeworship:

Making the invisible visible, with ink and type
After documenting its progress on Twitter for over a month, Laura Hudson’s inky typographic project reached its zenith this weekend. As part of her final degree project, Laura has created a time-lapse film of ink being absorbed into a lettered design to reveal a message about the invisible nature of mental illness.
As a sufferer of depression Laura wanted to highlight a cause she felt passionate and aligned her project with the Time to Change mental health campaign. “The idea is as the ink absorbs it’s physically making the fact visible, raising awareness.”
Inspired by Oscar Diaz’s Ink calendar, she contacted him to ask about paper typed used, but after a slightly cagey response she decided to test out different types of paper herself, finally settling on 300gsm scientific grade blotting paper.
Her lettered design was then laser cut into the paper and suspended in her studio. The ends of the paper structure rested in vials of cyan printer ink and the natural capillary action of the paper drew the pigment up the lettering. The process produced some lovely chromatic bleed effects (as shown).
Laura took time-lapse photos to record the process. In tests the ink moved 15cm in five minutes over a straight line but at the scale of the final design it slowed dramatically after six days, requiring only one photograph every 12 hours to measure its progress. Other challenges also cropped up on the way: “Unfortunately I’ll be pressing the camera shutter for my project. Time lapse is broken so now I’m babysitting!”
After a little ‘encouragement’ with warm water the ink was finally absorbed into the whole piece and the film was completed. Take a look here.
typeworship:

Making the invisible visible, with ink and type
After documenting its progress on Twitter for over a month, Laura Hudson’s inky typographic project reached its zenith this weekend. As part of her final degree project, Laura has created a time-lapse film of ink being absorbed into a lettered design to reveal a message about the invisible nature of mental illness.
As a sufferer of depression Laura wanted to highlight a cause she felt passionate and aligned her project with the Time to Change mental health campaign. “The idea is as the ink absorbs it’s physically making the fact visible, raising awareness.”
Inspired by Oscar Diaz’s Ink calendar, she contacted him to ask about paper typed used, but after a slightly cagey response she decided to test out different types of paper herself, finally settling on 300gsm scientific grade blotting paper.
Her lettered design was then laser cut into the paper and suspended in her studio. The ends of the paper structure rested in vials of cyan printer ink and the natural capillary action of the paper drew the pigment up the lettering. The process produced some lovely chromatic bleed effects (as shown).
Laura took time-lapse photos to record the process. In tests the ink moved 15cm in five minutes over a straight line but at the scale of the final design it slowed dramatically after six days, requiring only one photograph every 12 hours to measure its progress. Other challenges also cropped up on the way: “Unfortunately I’ll be pressing the camera shutter for my project. Time lapse is broken so now I’m babysitting!”
After a little ‘encouragement’ with warm water the ink was finally absorbed into the whole piece and the film was completed. Take a look here.
typeworship:

Making the invisible visible, with ink and type
After documenting its progress on Twitter for over a month, Laura Hudson’s inky typographic project reached its zenith this weekend. As part of her final degree project, Laura has created a time-lapse film of ink being absorbed into a lettered design to reveal a message about the invisible nature of mental illness.
As a sufferer of depression Laura wanted to highlight a cause she felt passionate and aligned her project with the Time to Change mental health campaign. “The idea is as the ink absorbs it’s physically making the fact visible, raising awareness.”
Inspired by Oscar Diaz’s Ink calendar, she contacted him to ask about paper typed used, but after a slightly cagey response she decided to test out different types of paper herself, finally settling on 300gsm scientific grade blotting paper.
Her lettered design was then laser cut into the paper and suspended in her studio. The ends of the paper structure rested in vials of cyan printer ink and the natural capillary action of the paper drew the pigment up the lettering. The process produced some lovely chromatic bleed effects (as shown).
Laura took time-lapse photos to record the process. In tests the ink moved 15cm in five minutes over a straight line but at the scale of the final design it slowed dramatically after six days, requiring only one photograph every 12 hours to measure its progress. Other challenges also cropped up on the way: “Unfortunately I’ll be pressing the camera shutter for my project. Time lapse is broken so now I’m babysitting!”
After a little ‘encouragement’ with warm water the ink was finally absorbed into the whole piece and the film was completed. Take a look here.
typeworship:

Making the invisible visible, with ink and type
After documenting its progress on Twitter for over a month, Laura Hudson’s inky typographic project reached its zenith this weekend. As part of her final degree project, Laura has created a time-lapse film of ink being absorbed into a lettered design to reveal a message about the invisible nature of mental illness.
As a sufferer of depression Laura wanted to highlight a cause she felt passionate and aligned her project with the Time to Change mental health campaign. “The idea is as the ink absorbs it’s physically making the fact visible, raising awareness.”
Inspired by Oscar Diaz’s Ink calendar, she contacted him to ask about paper typed used, but after a slightly cagey response she decided to test out different types of paper herself, finally settling on 300gsm scientific grade blotting paper.
Her lettered design was then laser cut into the paper and suspended in her studio. The ends of the paper structure rested in vials of cyan printer ink and the natural capillary action of the paper drew the pigment up the lettering. The process produced some lovely chromatic bleed effects (as shown).
Laura took time-lapse photos to record the process. In tests the ink moved 15cm in five minutes over a straight line but at the scale of the final design it slowed dramatically after six days, requiring only one photograph every 12 hours to measure its progress. Other challenges also cropped up on the way: “Unfortunately I’ll be pressing the camera shutter for my project. Time lapse is broken so now I’m babysitting!”
After a little ‘encouragement’ with warm water the ink was finally absorbed into the whole piece and the film was completed. Take a look here.
typeworship:

Making the invisible visible, with ink and type
After documenting its progress on Twitter for over a month, Laura Hudson’s inky typographic project reached its zenith this weekend. As part of her final degree project, Laura has created a time-lapse film of ink being absorbed into a lettered design to reveal a message about the invisible nature of mental illness.
As a sufferer of depression Laura wanted to highlight a cause she felt passionate and aligned her project with the Time to Change mental health campaign. “The idea is as the ink absorbs it’s physically making the fact visible, raising awareness.”
Inspired by Oscar Diaz’s Ink calendar, she contacted him to ask about paper typed used, but after a slightly cagey response she decided to test out different types of paper herself, finally settling on 300gsm scientific grade blotting paper.
Her lettered design was then laser cut into the paper and suspended in her studio. The ends of the paper structure rested in vials of cyan printer ink and the natural capillary action of the paper drew the pigment up the lettering. The process produced some lovely chromatic bleed effects (as shown).
Laura took time-lapse photos to record the process. In tests the ink moved 15cm in five minutes over a straight line but at the scale of the final design it slowed dramatically after six days, requiring only one photograph every 12 hours to measure its progress. Other challenges also cropped up on the way: “Unfortunately I’ll be pressing the camera shutter for my project. Time lapse is broken so now I’m babysitting!”
After a little ‘encouragement’ with warm water the ink was finally absorbed into the whole piece and the film was completed. Take a look here.
typeworship:

Making the invisible visible, with ink and type
After documenting its progress on Twitter for over a month, Laura Hudson’s inky typographic project reached its zenith this weekend. As part of her final degree project, Laura has created a time-lapse film of ink being absorbed into a lettered design to reveal a message about the invisible nature of mental illness.
As a sufferer of depression Laura wanted to highlight a cause she felt passionate and aligned her project with the Time to Change mental health campaign. “The idea is as the ink absorbs it’s physically making the fact visible, raising awareness.”
Inspired by Oscar Diaz’s Ink calendar, she contacted him to ask about paper typed used, but after a slightly cagey response she decided to test out different types of paper herself, finally settling on 300gsm scientific grade blotting paper.
Her lettered design was then laser cut into the paper and suspended in her studio. The ends of the paper structure rested in vials of cyan printer ink and the natural capillary action of the paper drew the pigment up the lettering. The process produced some lovely chromatic bleed effects (as shown).
Laura took time-lapse photos to record the process. In tests the ink moved 15cm in five minutes over a straight line but at the scale of the final design it slowed dramatically after six days, requiring only one photograph every 12 hours to measure its progress. Other challenges also cropped up on the way: “Unfortunately I’ll be pressing the camera shutter for my project. Time lapse is broken so now I’m babysitting!”
After a little ‘encouragement’ with warm water the ink was finally absorbed into the whole piece and the film was completed. Take a look here.
typeworship:

Making the invisible visible, with ink and type
After documenting its progress on Twitter for over a month, Laura Hudson’s inky typographic project reached its zenith this weekend. As part of her final degree project, Laura has created a time-lapse film of ink being absorbed into a lettered design to reveal a message about the invisible nature of mental illness.
As a sufferer of depression Laura wanted to highlight a cause she felt passionate and aligned her project with the Time to Change mental health campaign. “The idea is as the ink absorbs it’s physically making the fact visible, raising awareness.”
Inspired by Oscar Diaz’s Ink calendar, she contacted him to ask about paper typed used, but after a slightly cagey response she decided to test out different types of paper herself, finally settling on 300gsm scientific grade blotting paper.
Her lettered design was then laser cut into the paper and suspended in her studio. The ends of the paper structure rested in vials of cyan printer ink and the natural capillary action of the paper drew the pigment up the lettering. The process produced some lovely chromatic bleed effects (as shown).
Laura took time-lapse photos to record the process. In tests the ink moved 15cm in five minutes over a straight line but at the scale of the final design it slowed dramatically after six days, requiring only one photograph every 12 hours to measure its progress. Other challenges also cropped up on the way: “Unfortunately I’ll be pressing the camera shutter for my project. Time lapse is broken so now I’m babysitting!”
After a little ‘encouragement’ with warm water the ink was finally absorbed into the whole piece and the film was completed. Take a look here.
typeworship:

Making the invisible visible, with ink and type
After documenting its progress on Twitter for over a month, Laura Hudson’s inky typographic project reached its zenith this weekend. As part of her final degree project, Laura has created a time-lapse film of ink being absorbed into a lettered design to reveal a message about the invisible nature of mental illness.
As a sufferer of depression Laura wanted to highlight a cause she felt passionate and aligned her project with the Time to Change mental health campaign. “The idea is as the ink absorbs it’s physically making the fact visible, raising awareness.”
Inspired by Oscar Diaz’s Ink calendar, she contacted him to ask about paper typed used, but after a slightly cagey response she decided to test out different types of paper herself, finally settling on 300gsm scientific grade blotting paper.
Her lettered design was then laser cut into the paper and suspended in her studio. The ends of the paper structure rested in vials of cyan printer ink and the natural capillary action of the paper drew the pigment up the lettering. The process produced some lovely chromatic bleed effects (as shown).
Laura took time-lapse photos to record the process. In tests the ink moved 15cm in five minutes over a straight line but at the scale of the final design it slowed dramatically after six days, requiring only one photograph every 12 hours to measure its progress. Other challenges also cropped up on the way: “Unfortunately I’ll be pressing the camera shutter for my project. Time lapse is broken so now I’m babysitting!”
After a little ‘encouragement’ with warm water the ink was finally absorbed into the whole piece and the film was completed. Take a look here.
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la-face-b:

Clase bcn
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thevectorian:

lg2.com
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graphicporn:

"If you can design one thing, you can design everything"
Massimo Vignelli, 1931 - 2014
image via Pentagram
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thedsgnblog:

RIP Massimo Vignelli
Vignelli tribute poster series by Anthony Neil Dart - a South African born Designer / Director now living and working in Seattle, Washington, USA for Xbox. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
thedsgnblog:

RIP Massimo Vignelli
Vignelli tribute poster series by Anthony Neil Dart - a South African born Designer / Director now living and working in Seattle, Washington, USA for Xbox. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
thedsgnblog:

RIP Massimo Vignelli
Vignelli tribute poster series by Anthony Neil Dart - a South African born Designer / Director now living and working in Seattle, Washington, USA for Xbox. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
thedsgnblog:

RIP Massimo Vignelli
Vignelli tribute poster series by Anthony Neil Dart - a South African born Designer / Director now living and working in Seattle, Washington, USA for Xbox. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
thedsgnblog:

RIP Massimo Vignelli
Vignelli tribute poster series by Anthony Neil Dart - a South African born Designer / Director now living and working in Seattle, Washington, USA for Xbox. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
thedsgnblog:

RIP Massimo Vignelli
Vignelli tribute poster series by Anthony Neil Dart - a South African born Designer / Director now living and working in Seattle, Washington, USA for Xbox. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
+
typeworship:

Lettered tweets
For the month of May, Sydney based, Dave Foster has been Lettering his tweets. A type designer and letterer, Dave recently graduated from the Type and Media Masters program at the Royal Academy of Art in the Netherlands. I was really taken the quick, off-the-cuff style of the tweets. I met Dave on my recent trip to Australia and followed-up with a few questions:
What prompted you to letter your tweets?
A mass of long-term client work made me want to just smash out a non-commercial, manageable project that would let me get regain a sense of immediacy to the work I was doing. It just seemed like a logical way to highlight the skills I’ve been developing since the inception of photo sharing in the news feed.
Do they convey a lot more information?
They’re pretty straight forward, I wouldn’t say there is much there beyond what is visible, they’re not meant to be complicated.
Have you found the lettered tweet have a lot more impact?
Yeah, people interact with what I’m saying more, I think they stand out from all the plain text feed. Perhaps I’ll continue doing it after May if I can keep it up.
Has anyone lettered a reply?
Not yet! Still a few days to go though!
There’s plenty more inspiring lettering over on Dave’s website.
typeworship:

Lettered tweets
For the month of May, Sydney based, Dave Foster has been Lettering his tweets. A type designer and letterer, Dave recently graduated from the Type and Media Masters program at the Royal Academy of Art in the Netherlands. I was really taken the quick, off-the-cuff style of the tweets. I met Dave on my recent trip to Australia and followed-up with a few questions:
What prompted you to letter your tweets?
A mass of long-term client work made me want to just smash out a non-commercial, manageable project that would let me get regain a sense of immediacy to the work I was doing. It just seemed like a logical way to highlight the skills I’ve been developing since the inception of photo sharing in the news feed.
Do they convey a lot more information?
They’re pretty straight forward, I wouldn’t say there is much there beyond what is visible, they’re not meant to be complicated.
Have you found the lettered tweet have a lot more impact?
Yeah, people interact with what I’m saying more, I think they stand out from all the plain text feed. Perhaps I’ll continue doing it after May if I can keep it up.
Has anyone lettered a reply?
Not yet! Still a few days to go though!
There’s plenty more inspiring lettering over on Dave’s website.
typeworship:

Lettered tweets
For the month of May, Sydney based, Dave Foster has been Lettering his tweets. A type designer and letterer, Dave recently graduated from the Type and Media Masters program at the Royal Academy of Art in the Netherlands. I was really taken the quick, off-the-cuff style of the tweets. I met Dave on my recent trip to Australia and followed-up with a few questions:
What prompted you to letter your tweets?
A mass of long-term client work made me want to just smash out a non-commercial, manageable project that would let me get regain a sense of immediacy to the work I was doing. It just seemed like a logical way to highlight the skills I’ve been developing since the inception of photo sharing in the news feed.
Do they convey a lot more information?
They’re pretty straight forward, I wouldn’t say there is much there beyond what is visible, they’re not meant to be complicated.
Have you found the lettered tweet have a lot more impact?
Yeah, people interact with what I’m saying more, I think they stand out from all the plain text feed. Perhaps I’ll continue doing it after May if I can keep it up.
Has anyone lettered a reply?
Not yet! Still a few days to go though!
There’s plenty more inspiring lettering over on Dave’s website.
typeworship:

Lettered tweets
For the month of May, Sydney based, Dave Foster has been Lettering his tweets. A type designer and letterer, Dave recently graduated from the Type and Media Masters program at the Royal Academy of Art in the Netherlands. I was really taken the quick, off-the-cuff style of the tweets. I met Dave on my recent trip to Australia and followed-up with a few questions:
What prompted you to letter your tweets?
A mass of long-term client work made me want to just smash out a non-commercial, manageable project that would let me get regain a sense of immediacy to the work I was doing. It just seemed like a logical way to highlight the skills I’ve been developing since the inception of photo sharing in the news feed.
Do they convey a lot more information?
They’re pretty straight forward, I wouldn’t say there is much there beyond what is visible, they’re not meant to be complicated.
Have you found the lettered tweet have a lot more impact?
Yeah, people interact with what I’m saying more, I think they stand out from all the plain text feed. Perhaps I’ll continue doing it after May if I can keep it up.
Has anyone lettered a reply?
Not yet! Still a few days to go though!
There’s plenty more inspiring lettering over on Dave’s website.
typeworship:

Lettered tweets
For the month of May, Sydney based, Dave Foster has been Lettering his tweets. A type designer and letterer, Dave recently graduated from the Type and Media Masters program at the Royal Academy of Art in the Netherlands. I was really taken the quick, off-the-cuff style of the tweets. I met Dave on my recent trip to Australia and followed-up with a few questions:
What prompted you to letter your tweets?
A mass of long-term client work made me want to just smash out a non-commercial, manageable project that would let me get regain a sense of immediacy to the work I was doing. It just seemed like a logical way to highlight the skills I’ve been developing since the inception of photo sharing in the news feed.
Do they convey a lot more information?
They’re pretty straight forward, I wouldn’t say there is much there beyond what is visible, they’re not meant to be complicated.
Have you found the lettered tweet have a lot more impact?
Yeah, people interact with what I’m saying more, I think they stand out from all the plain text feed. Perhaps I’ll continue doing it after May if I can keep it up.
Has anyone lettered a reply?
Not yet! Still a few days to go though!
There’s plenty more inspiring lettering over on Dave’s website.
typeworship:

Lettered tweets
For the month of May, Sydney based, Dave Foster has been Lettering his tweets. A type designer and letterer, Dave recently graduated from the Type and Media Masters program at the Royal Academy of Art in the Netherlands. I was really taken the quick, off-the-cuff style of the tweets. I met Dave on my recent trip to Australia and followed-up with a few questions:
What prompted you to letter your tweets?
A mass of long-term client work made me want to just smash out a non-commercial, manageable project that would let me get regain a sense of immediacy to the work I was doing. It just seemed like a logical way to highlight the skills I’ve been developing since the inception of photo sharing in the news feed.
Do they convey a lot more information?
They’re pretty straight forward, I wouldn’t say there is much there beyond what is visible, they’re not meant to be complicated.
Have you found the lettered tweet have a lot more impact?
Yeah, people interact with what I’m saying more, I think they stand out from all the plain text feed. Perhaps I’ll continue doing it after May if I can keep it up.
Has anyone lettered a reply?
Not yet! Still a few days to go though!
There’s plenty more inspiring lettering over on Dave’s website.
typeworship:

Lettered tweets
For the month of May, Sydney based, Dave Foster has been Lettering his tweets. A type designer and letterer, Dave recently graduated from the Type and Media Masters program at the Royal Academy of Art in the Netherlands. I was really taken the quick, off-the-cuff style of the tweets. I met Dave on my recent trip to Australia and followed-up with a few questions:
What prompted you to letter your tweets?
A mass of long-term client work made me want to just smash out a non-commercial, manageable project that would let me get regain a sense of immediacy to the work I was doing. It just seemed like a logical way to highlight the skills I’ve been developing since the inception of photo sharing in the news feed.
Do they convey a lot more information?
They’re pretty straight forward, I wouldn’t say there is much there beyond what is visible, they’re not meant to be complicated.
Have you found the lettered tweet have a lot more impact?
Yeah, people interact with what I’m saying more, I think they stand out from all the plain text feed. Perhaps I’ll continue doing it after May if I can keep it up.
Has anyone lettered a reply?
Not yet! Still a few days to go though!
There’s plenty more inspiring lettering over on Dave’s website.
typeworship:

Lettered tweets
For the month of May, Sydney based, Dave Foster has been Lettering his tweets. A type designer and letterer, Dave recently graduated from the Type and Media Masters program at the Royal Academy of Art in the Netherlands. I was really taken the quick, off-the-cuff style of the tweets. I met Dave on my recent trip to Australia and followed-up with a few questions:
What prompted you to letter your tweets?
A mass of long-term client work made me want to just smash out a non-commercial, manageable project that would let me get regain a sense of immediacy to the work I was doing. It just seemed like a logical way to highlight the skills I’ve been developing since the inception of photo sharing in the news feed.
Do they convey a lot more information?
They’re pretty straight forward, I wouldn’t say there is much there beyond what is visible, they’re not meant to be complicated.
Have you found the lettered tweet have a lot more impact?
Yeah, people interact with what I’m saying more, I think they stand out from all the plain text feed. Perhaps I’ll continue doing it after May if I can keep it up.
Has anyone lettered a reply?
Not yet! Still a few days to go though!
There’s plenty more inspiring lettering over on Dave’s website.
typeworship:

Lettered tweets
For the month of May, Sydney based, Dave Foster has been Lettering his tweets. A type designer and letterer, Dave recently graduated from the Type and Media Masters program at the Royal Academy of Art in the Netherlands. I was really taken the quick, off-the-cuff style of the tweets. I met Dave on my recent trip to Australia and followed-up with a few questions:
What prompted you to letter your tweets?
A mass of long-term client work made me want to just smash out a non-commercial, manageable project that would let me get regain a sense of immediacy to the work I was doing. It just seemed like a logical way to highlight the skills I’ve been developing since the inception of photo sharing in the news feed.
Do they convey a lot more information?
They’re pretty straight forward, I wouldn’t say there is much there beyond what is visible, they’re not meant to be complicated.
Have you found the lettered tweet have a lot more impact?
Yeah, people interact with what I’m saying more, I think they stand out from all the plain text feed. Perhaps I’ll continue doing it after May if I can keep it up.
Has anyone lettered a reply?
Not yet! Still a few days to go though!
There’s plenty more inspiring lettering over on Dave’s website.
typeworship:

Lettered tweets
For the month of May, Sydney based, Dave Foster has been Lettering his tweets. A type designer and letterer, Dave recently graduated from the Type and Media Masters program at the Royal Academy of Art in the Netherlands. I was really taken the quick, off-the-cuff style of the tweets. I met Dave on my recent trip to Australia and followed-up with a few questions:
What prompted you to letter your tweets?
A mass of long-term client work made me want to just smash out a non-commercial, manageable project that would let me get regain a sense of immediacy to the work I was doing. It just seemed like a logical way to highlight the skills I’ve been developing since the inception of photo sharing in the news feed.
Do they convey a lot more information?
They’re pretty straight forward, I wouldn’t say there is much there beyond what is visible, they’re not meant to be complicated.
Have you found the lettered tweet have a lot more impact?
Yeah, people interact with what I’m saying more, I think they stand out from all the plain text feed. Perhaps I’ll continue doing it after May if I can keep it up.
Has anyone lettered a reply?
Not yet! Still a few days to go though!
There’s plenty more inspiring lettering over on Dave’s website.
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typeworship:

TextAppeal Experiments
I like the shapes within shapes used used in these experiments by Ana Gomez Bernaus of California. Inspired in Spanish Mantillas (a veil worn over the head and shoulders).
typeworship:

TextAppeal Experiments
I like the shapes within shapes used used in these experiments by Ana Gomez Bernaus of California. Inspired in Spanish Mantillas (a veil worn over the head and shoulders).
typeworship:

TextAppeal Experiments
I like the shapes within shapes used used in these experiments by Ana Gomez Bernaus of California. Inspired in Spanish Mantillas (a veil worn over the head and shoulders).
typeworship:

TextAppeal Experiments
I like the shapes within shapes used used in these experiments by Ana Gomez Bernaus of California. Inspired in Spanish Mantillas (a veil worn over the head and shoulders).